Helpful terms to know in the recruiting process.


Contact. A contact is when a coach has any face-to-face contact with a student-athlete or the student-athlete's parents off the college’s campus. A contact also occurs if a coach has any contact with the student-athlete or the student-athlete's parents at the student-athlete’s high school or any location where the student-athlete is competing or practicing.


Contact Period. A contact period is a time when a college coach may have in-person contact with a student-athlete and the student-athlete’s parents on or off the college’s campus. The coach may also watch the student-athlete play or visit the student-athlete's high school.


Dead Period. A dead period is a time when a college coach may not have any in-person contact with the student-athlete or the student-athlete's parents at any time. The coach may write and telephone during this time.


Equivalency Sport. An equivalency sport is a sport that has a set number of scholarships but each one can be divided into partial scholarships. For example, division one baseball is an equivalency sport. Division one baseball programs have 11.7 scholarships that can be divided among student-athletes. Obviously if the student-athlete is good enough, they can offer the student-athlete a full scholarship.


Evaluation. An evaluation is an activity by a coach to evaluate a student-athlete’s academic or athletic ability. This would include visiting the student-athlete’s high school or watch the student-athlete in competition or practice.


Evaluation Period. An evaluation period is a time when a college coach may watch a student-athlete play or visit the high school but cannot have any in-person conversations with student-athlete or student-athlete's parents off the college’s campus. The student-athlete and the student-athlete's parents can visit a college campus during this period and a coach may call or write during this period.


Head Count Sport. A head count sport is a sport that has a set number of scholarships and they are full scholarships. For example, division one football is a head count sport. Division one football programs have 85 scholarships and they are all full scholarships, there are no partial scholarships.


National Letter of Intent. A national letter of intent is the document a student-athlete signs when he or she agrees to attend the designated college or university for one academic year.


Nonqualifier. A nonqualifier is a student who has not graduated from high school or who, at the time specified in the regulation, did not present the core-curriculum grade-point average and/or SAT/ACT score required for a qualifier.


Official Visit. An official visit is a student-athlete’s visit to a college campus paid for by the college. The college can pay for transportation to and from the college, room and meals while visiting and reasonable entertainment expenses. A recruit may take up to five official visits.


Qualifier. A qualifier is a student who, for purposes of determining eligibility for financial aid, practice and competition, has met all of the following requirements:
a. Gradation from high school;
b. Successful completion of a required core curriculum consisting of a minimum number of courses in specified subjects;
c. Specified minimum grade-point average in the core curriculum; and
d. Specified minimum SAT or ACT score.


Quiet Period. A quiet period is a time when a college may not have any in-person talk with the student-athlete or the student-athlete's parents off the college’s campus. The coach may not watch the student-athlete play or practice. The student-athlete can visit college campuses during this time and a coach may write or telephone.


Recruiting. Recruiting is any solicitation of student-athlete or a student-athlete’s relatives (or legal guardians) by an institutional staff member or by a representative of the institution’s athletics interests for the purpose of securing the student-athlete’s enrollment and ultimate participation in the institution’s intercollegiate athletics program.


Unofficial Visit. An unofficial visit is any visit by a student-athlete and their parents to a college campus paid for by student athlete or the student-athlete's parents. The only expense the student-athlete can receive from the college is three complimentary admissions to a home athletics contest. The student-athlete may make as many visits as he or she likes and may take the visits at any time. The only time the student-athlete cannot talk with a coach during an unofficial visit is during a dead period.


Verbal Commitment. A verbal commitment is used to describe a college-bound student-athlete’s commitment to a school before he or she is able to sign a National Letter of Intent. A college-bound student athlete can announce a verbal commitment at any time. While verbal commitments have become popular, they are NOT binding on either the college-bound student-athlete or the school.


All terms in the glossary are provided by NCAA.org or the 2010-11 NCAA Division I Manual. The glossary is for informational use only.

 
 
 
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